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News

| 31.08.2020

It is about more than just antibody levels

Ebola vaccination provides less protection than surviving Ebola disease

The number of Ebola-specific antibodies in the blood is as high after an Ebola vaccination as after a natural infection. However, these antibodies provide less protection against re-infection than antibodies from Ebola survivors. These new research results were recently published in the journal Viruses by the research group of Prof. César Muñoz-Fontela of the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM).

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News

| 25.08.2020

Stellungnahme zu Äußerungen von PD Dr. med. Norbert Schwarz

Das Bernhard-Nocht-Institut für Tropenmedizin (BNITM) widmet sich intensiv der Eindämmung der COVID-19-Pandemie. Den Herausforderungen der momentanen Situation begegnet das BNITM auf Grundlage von gesicherten wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen. In der folgenden Stellungnahme distanziert sich der Vorstand des BNITM ausdrücklich von den Aussagen des Mitarbeiters PD Dr. med. Norbert Schwarz, die er in einem Interview getätigt hat.

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News

| 20.08.2020

World Mosquito Day 2020

Today is World Mosquito Day. The Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM) dedicates a large part of its research to mosquitoes and the pathogens they transmit. This is because mosquitoes are crucial for the spread of major infectious diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, or dengue fever. The insects are therefore not only annoying, but also a major threat to global health. BNITM supports the fight against tropical infectious diseases. In addition, scientists have been monitoring the mosquito populations in Germany for many years. The latest results provide answers to important questions: Can native mosquitoes transmit tropical viruses? Does the mosquito's immune system influence its ability to transmit pathogens? What influence do environmental changes have? 

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News

| 06.08.2020

Excessive immune response to COVID-19 and malaria

Inter-institutional Hamburg research team finds reasons for parallels

Altered immune cells are apparently partly responsible for the strong immune response in patients with severe COVID-19 and malaria. This is what researchers from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine and the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered recently. The results of their study were pre-published in Frontiers in Immunology.

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Research Highlight

| 17.07.2020

Dangerous diarrhoea in infants and young children in sub-Saharan Africa: New findings on transmission pathways of cryptosporidia

Cryptosporidia are mainly transmitted from child to child. The close coexistence with farm animals is not of great importance, contrary to what has been assumed so far. This is the conclusion reached by a research group of the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine. The Infection Epidemiology Group, led by Daniel Eibach and Ralf Krumkamp, has carried out the largest study on cryptosporidia to date and recently published its work in the journal Clinical Infectious Deseases.

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News

| 15.07.2020

Male hormones promote excessive immune reaction

Testosterone overactivates the innate immune system

Hamburg, July 15th, 2020 – Sex hormones influence a certain group of immune cells to different extents. This was discovered by a research team from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine. The research group led by Hanna Lotter and Julie Sellau showed for the first time that monocytes, which are important for the immune response against invading parasites, are directly influenced by male sex hormones. This discovery was recently published in the journal Nature Communications. The work was done in cooperation with the group of Prof. Dr. Marcus Altfeld of the Heinrich-Pette-Institute, Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology (HPI) with the support of the Landesforschungsförderung Hamburg, inter alia.

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News

| 30.06.2020

Den Geheimnissen des Malariaparasiten auf der Spur

BNITM-Gruppe identifiziert ein neues Protein am DESY

Das Forschungsteam um Prof. Tim Gilberger hat erstmals ein Protein aus einer bestimmten Gruppe von Eiweißmolekülen, den Lipocalinen, im Malariaparasiten Plasmodium falciparum identifiziert. Die Entdeckung hilft, den Lebenszyklus des Parasiten besser zu verstehen, der in weiten Teilen der Erde zu den größten Gesundheitsbedrohungen gehört. Ermöglicht wurde die Neuentdeckung am Zentrum für Systembiologie (CSSB) und in Zusammenarbeit mit den Deutschen Elektronen-Synchroton (DESY). Sie veröffentlichten ihre Ergebnisse in der Fachzeitschrift „Cell Reports“.

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News

| 24.06.2020

African eye worm causes significant adverse effects

Contrary to what was previously thought, Loiasis is not a harmless tropical disease. The worm infection impairs the quality of life and performance of those affected more than previously assumed. A team at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM) in cooperation with the Centre de Recherches Médicales de Lambaréné (CERMEL) has investigated this and has now published the results in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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News

| 05.06.2020

Neuer Therapieansatz gegen häufige Reise-Hautkrankheit Leishmaniose

Moleküle aus dem Labor

Eine Forschungsgruppe am Bernhard-Nocht-Institut für Tropenmedizin (BNITM) hat neue Moleküle identifiziert, um die Behandlung der kutanen Leishmaniose, einer der häufigsten Reise-Dermatosen, zu verbessern. Die Gruppe um Prof. Hannelore Lotter stellt in der Fachzeitschrift Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy eine Gruppe von Wirkstoffen vor, die das Immunsystem aktiv gegen die entsprechenden Erreger stimuliert (Fehling et al., 2020).

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Research Highlight

| 20.05.2020

Binding of malaria parasites to blood vessels of vital organs further deciphered

Plasmodium falciparum is the most dangerous of the various malaria pathogens and, if left untreated, leads to severe, life-threatening disease progression. The malaria pathogen is a parasite and infects red blood cells (erythrocytes). These bind to the walls of small blood vessels and can damage important organs, such as the kidneys, lungs or brain, through lack of oxygen and overactivation of the immune system. The research group led by Prof. Iris Bruchhaus at the Bernhard Nocht Institute of Tropical Medicine (BNITM) has deciphered the complex processes that occur during the interaction of infected erythrocytes with different receptors of the blood vessel walls. The results of this work were recently published in the journal Scientific Reports.

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