Research

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Prof. Dr. med. Egbert TannichPhone: +49 40 42818-477
Mail: tannich(at)bnitm.de

How Amoebae are recognized and killed by immune cells

Studying mice we have found that amoebae, after leaving the intestinal tract and invading the tissue, may be recognized and killed by immune cells.

Amoebae (purple) in human intestinal tissue (Image: Paul Racz).

Studying mice we have found that amoebae, after leaving the intestinal tract and invading the tissue, may be recognized and killed by immune cells. Certain sugar structures (lipophosphoglycans) present on the amoeba surface are recognized by certain immune cells (NKT cells), which then stimulate other cells (macrophages) to kill the amoebae. Now we are trying to find out why this does not work in all humans infected with amoebae.

Lotter H. et al., PloS Pathog 2009, 5:e1000434
Hannelore Lotter, Nestor Gonzalez-Roldan, Claudia Marggraff and Egbert Tannich (Molecular Parasitology), Thomas Jacobs (Immunology), Otto Holst (Research Center Borstel)